Photos from Niue

 

Niue, north of Alofi

Niue is described as a "raised atoll" with steep limestone cliffs along the coast with a central plateau rising to about 60 metres above sea level. Most villages are along the coast. Going clockwise around the island, there is Avaiki Cave, named after the legendary Maori Polynesian homeland Avaiki (or Hawaiki) and was where Niue's first Maori settlers landed and an exclusive place for the ancient kings of Niue to bathe. Beyond that is Palaha Cave, 6 kilometres north of Alofi, one of the most spectacular caves in the South Pacific. There are crystal clear waters in coral pools near the village of Limu and the natural limestone Arches of Talava, a complex place of caves and arches carved out into the coral near the village of Hikutavake, about 12 kilometres from Alofi in the north west of the island with a population of 65 according to the census of 2001.

The village of Mutalau (with a population of 133 as of the 2001 census) was the first place on Niue where Christian missionaries were admitted and opposite the church is a monument commemorating the arrival on 26 October 1846 of Nukai Peniamina, the first Niuean convert, and in 1849 the first Samoan teacher, Paulo. Its previous names were Ululauta and Matahefonua, both meaning "head of the land": is the most northern village on Niue. The road from here along the east coast runs between 500 metres and a kilometre from the coast through the villages of Lakepa and Liku. From both these villages a direct road leads through the interior of the island back to Alofi, about 15 kilometres away.


Coral formation
Coral formation

Palaha Cave entrance
Palaha Cave entrance

Village of Limu
Village of Limu

Limu Pools
Limu Pools

Boy of Hikutavake
Boy of Hikutavake

Monument in Mutalau
Monument in Mutalau

Lakepa village
Lakepa village

Girl of Lakepa
Girl of Lakepa

Girls of Lakepa
Girls of Lakepa

Young men from Liku
Young men from Liku

Coast at Palaha
Coast at Palaha

Avaiki Cave
Avaiki Cave

Coast at Avaiki
Coast at Avaiki

Nukai Peniamina's grave
Nukai Peniamina's grave

Matapa Chasm
Matapa Chasm

Arches of Talava
Arches of Talava

Rock pool at Talava
Rock pool at Talava

Children of Hikutavake
Children of Hikutavake

Boys of Hikutavake
Boys of Hikutavake

Boy of Niue
Boy of Niue

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